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Causes Of Migration

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Categoría: Acontecimientos Sociales

Enviado por: mondoro 17 junio 2011

Palabras: 1044 | Páginas: 5

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caused by the previous two decades of immigration-driven population growth. By 1925 in US, Congress had reduced immigration numbers toward more traditional levels. The annual population growth rate at the end of the decade had been cut almost in half from the beginning. But very high immigration of the first half of the decade, and the momentum caused by the high fertility, helped the 1920s to set yet another record for highest population growth.

The number of immigrants in USA was 4,107,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 1,200,000

The Great Depression Decade

1930-40

The 1924 immigration law and the Great Depression kept immigration below traditional levels. USA greatly reduced their fertility to respond to the dire economic times, cutting total population growth for the decade nearly in half from each of the previous three decades.

Deportations of immigrants who had organized or participated in strikes or other organized labour activities. Ralph Webb[2] campaigned to deport and prevent the admission of communists and agitators. He urged the "deportation of all undesirables".

The number of immigrants in USA was 528,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 149,000

The Baby Boom Decades

The baby boom describes a period of increased birthrates lasting from the early 1950s to about 1965.

The great depression of the 1930s had prolonged the decline in North America’s birthrate, as it had in most Western countries.

The baby boom began with the births of children who had been postponed during the Depression, but 2 other factors affected it as well. First, a larger proportion of adults married, and those who did had more children. Second, more than 50% of baby-boom births can be attributed to what demographers call "timing phenomena." More adults married at a younger age, and between the end of WWII and 1965, young couples tended to have their children during the first few years of married life.

1940-50

After the end of World War II in 1945, immigration grew back toward traditional levels and North Americans began to create very large families. The giant spike in fertility came to be known as the Baby Boom.

The number of immigrants in USA was 1,035, 000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 548,000

1950-60

This was the peak of the Baby Boom, adding nearly the equivalent of the entire U.S. population at the time of the Civil War. Combined with other factors, this led to an enormous conversion of farmland and natural habitats into sprawling suburbs. This new record for the biggest population boom ever was widely thought to be a special phenomenon reflecting pent-up pressures from the Depression and the war and one that would never be repeated or exceeded.

The number of immigrants in USA was 2,515,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 1,543,000

1960-70

North Americans rapidly reduced their fertility through the last decade of the Baby Boom. The growth rate at the end of the decade was a third lower than at the beginning. A vigorous social and political movement emerged calling for North Americans to keep their fertility to a replacement level rate to enable the country to eventually stabilize its population.

The number of immigrants in USA was 3,322,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 1,429,000

Low-Fertility/Immigration Tidal Wave Decades

1970-80

The North American fertility rate fell to replacement level in 1972, making it possible for the nation to eventually reach a widely held dream for a stable population.

The number of immigrants in USA was 4,493,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 1,429,000

1980-90

Population growth continued at the level of the previous decade. The reason was that Congress had created a system of chain migration that snowballed and doubled annual legal immigration over traditional levels.

The number of immigrants in USA was 7,338,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 1,876,000

1990- 1998

The population growth continues.

The number of immigrants in USA was 7,605,000

The number of immigrants in Canada was 2,186, 342 (Until 2002)

Immigrants: where are they from?

Canada:

The peopling of Canada is similar to the US story. The differences are:

The arrival from French in the mid-eighteenth Century.

The arriving from Britain, Ireland, and the United States after 1765.

Canada experienced the same reorientation in migration flows as United States in the XX Century.

Types: Mexican, Canada…

American Cultural influece

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[1] Global Commission on International Migration, “Migration in an Interconnected World: New Directions for Action,” (2005) p. 11.

[2] He was the Major from Winnipeg, Canada